An Interview with Zykor White

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Zykor White
By Uhuru B. Rowe
October 24, 2018
E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

Sometimes in life, we run across people whom we’ll just take an immediate liking to. Fellow prisoner Zykor White, #1898343, aka Syko Zyko, is such a person. I hadn’t been here at Greensville Correctional Center (GCC) for a week when a young Zykor came and sat down at a table with me in the day room and asked me what I was studying. As I began to expound on the book I was reading about the history of the Black liberation struggle in North Amerika, I could tell that much of what I speaking on was completely foreign to him. But he listened and asked questions which reminded me of myself when I was his age and seeking knowledge. And when he began to relate to me how he grew up in the small country town of Chase City, Virginia, how he came to be in prison, and what his aspirational goals are after release, I instantly wanted to interview him for this platform. Keep in mind as you’re reading this interview that Zykor is only 22-years-old — a young brother who, given the right guidance and investments in his future, would very likely have ended up being a successful entrepreneur rather than a prison inmate.

Uhuru: So young brother, talk about what your life was life growing up in Chase City?

Zykor: First I grew up with my mother in Boydton, Virginia. I stayed with my mother until I was about ten. At this time, my mother and father were already separated due to reasons I cannot fully understand. Later on, my mother gave custody of me to my father so she could move to Georgia to seek a better life for herself.

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Sylvester Thomas

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Sylvester Thomas
By Uhuru B. Rowe
May 28, 2018
E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

This interview is with a brother name Sylvester Thomas #1096150, also known as Wop, who is serving a juvenile life without the possibility of parole sentence — a sentence which has been ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. I first met Wop while attending the same religious program here at Sussex 2 State Prison. My first impression was that he’s an extremely humble, soft-spoken, and thoughtful brother who has a thirst for all kinds of knowledge, just like most of us trapped behind these walls. When I was released from segregation back in May, I was assigned to the same block as him and was anxious to do this interview with him. Here’s his testimony.

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Jadon Artis

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Jadon Artis
By Uhuru B. Rowe
April 18, 2018
E-mail: JPay.com

This is interview is with Jadon Artis, also known as Kokomo, a young brother I met one day while walking to a program here at Sussex 2 State Prison. After a brief conversation about the struggle, we instantly cliqued. He describes himself as a black man in Amerika fighting for freedom, justice, and equality and is striving to educate himself so that he can be self-sufficient in a society that’s designed to fail him. When he told me about his traumatic childhood experiences and how he overcame them, it blew my mind. And I am sure it will blow yours, too.

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 3

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 3
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 26, 2018

This is the last part of a three-part interview I conducted with Khali, my cellmate. After telling us more about some of his experiences in prison, he’s about to give some powerful words of wisdom to the youth who may be on the road to prison.

Part 3

Uhuru: Khali, in the second part of this interview you were talking about how prison authorities mistreat our loved-ones. I can definitely attest to the fact that these people do, in fact, mistreat our loved-ones when they come here for visitation. Just this past Sunday when my disabled mother came to visit me, she was forced to sit in the waiting room for almost three hours before they allowed her in to see me. What they have to go through in order to visit us — the long waiting periods, the aggressive searches, having to pass through an X-ray machine — it’s all very dehumanizing. And it begs the question: If a strong and positive relationship with our loved-ones is essential to our rehabilitation in prison and our successful reentry back into society after prison, why are prison authorities working so hard to discourage these relationships?

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview With Khali Pyatt, Part 2

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview With Khali Pyatt, Part 2
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 23, 2018

This is part 2 of a three-part interview I started on March 19th with my cellmate, Khali Pyatt. Please read carefully as he’s about to explain how his life was forever changed by a system that was designed to target and dispose of young Black and Brown bodies into its penitentiaries.

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 19, 2018

It was Sun Tzu who said that many calculations are made inside of a general’s lair. This cell that I am house in is a lair. So as a leader and forward-thinking individual, I decided to create this platform — Live From Behind Enemy Lines — as a calculated attempt to neutralize the misinformation put out to the public by media and law enforcement that people in prison are irredeemable; a bunch of animals, divorced from our humanity, who deserve to be locked up for the rest of our lives and forgotten about. That were incapable of transforming ourselves and, as a result, have nothing positive and meaningful to offer the world. The interviews that’ll appear on this platform will show the opposite — that we’re fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sons, and nephews who are loved by our families and communities. They will reflect our successes and failures, our strengths and weaknesses, but most importantly our resiliency — that is, our ability to survive, thrive, and prevail within a system that’s designed to hinder our efforts to redeem ourselves and strip us of our humanity at every turn.

This will be a three-part interview I started on March 19th with my cellmate, Khali Pyatt. Please listen to what this brother has to say and then decide for yourself if he deserves to die in prison.

Continue reading “Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1”