Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Jadon Artis

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Jadon Artis
By Uhuru B. Rowe
April 18, 2018
E-mail: JPay.com

This is interview is with Jadon Artis, also known as Kokomo, a young brother I met one day while walking to a program here at Sussex 2 State Prison. After a brief conversation about the struggle, we instantly cliqued. He describes himself as a black man in Amerika fighting for freedom, justice, and equality and is striving to educate himself so that he can be self-sufficient in a society that’s designed to fail him. When he told me about his traumatic childhood experiences and how he overcame them, it blew my mind. And I am sure it will blow yours, too.

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Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 3

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 3
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 26, 2018

This is the last part of a three-part interview I conducted with Khali, my cellmate. After telling us more about some of his experiences in prison, he’s about to give some powerful words of wisdom to the youth who may be on the road to prison.

Part 3

Uhuru: Khali, in the second part of this interview you were talking about how prison authorities mistreat our loved-ones. I can definitely attest to the fact that these people do, in fact, mistreat our loved-ones when they come here for visitation. Just this past Sunday when my disabled mother came to visit me, she was forced to sit in the waiting room for almost three hours before they allowed her in to see me. What they have to go through in order to visit us — the long waiting periods, the aggressive searches, having to pass through an X-ray machine — it’s all very dehumanizing. And it begs the question: If a strong and positive relationship with our loved-ones is essential to our rehabilitation in prison and our successful reentry back into society after prison, why are prison authorities working so hard to discourage these relationships?

Continue reading “Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 3”

Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview With Khali Pyatt, Part 2

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview With Khali Pyatt, Part 2
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 23, 2018

This is part 2 of a three-part interview I started on March 19th with my cellmate, Khali Pyatt. Please read carefully as he’s about to explain how his life was forever changed by a system that was designed to target and dispose of young Black and Brown bodies into its penitentiaries.

Continue reading “Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview With Khali Pyatt, Part 2”

Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1

The Free Virginia Movement Presents:

Live From Behind Enemy Lines:
An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1
By Uhuru B. Rowe
March 19, 2018

It was Sun Tzu who said that many calculations are made inside of a general’s lair. This cell that I am house in is a lair. So as a leader and forward-thinking individual, I decided to create this platform — Live From Behind Enemy Lines — as a calculated attempt to neutralize the misinformation put out to the public by media and law enforcement that people in prison are irredeemable; a bunch of animals, divorced from our humanity, who deserve to be locked up for the rest of our lives and forgotten about. That were incapable of transforming ourselves and, as a result, have nothing positive and meaningful to offer the world. The interviews that’ll appear on this platform will show the opposite — that we’re fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sons, and nephews who are loved by our families and communities. They will reflect our successes and failures, our strengths and weaknesses, but most importantly our resiliency — that is, our ability to survive, thrive, and prevail within a system that’s designed to hinder our efforts to redeem ourselves and strip us of our humanity at every turn.

This will be a three-part interview I started on March 19th with my cellmate, Khali Pyatt. Please listen to what this brother has to say and then decide for yourself if he deserves to die in prison.

Continue reading “Live From Behind Enemy Lines: An Interview with Khali Pyatt, Part 1”

My Continued Efforts To Expose and Resist The Contaminated Water Problem in Virginia Prisons. Part 2.

Part 2

In yet another incident at BKCC on August 26, 2016, at approximately 11:35 AM, the water in my cell turned a dark-brown color and had a foul taste and smell. I again developed severe nausea minutes after consuming about two cups of the water from the sink in my cell.

About ten minutes later, I filed an Emergency Grievance (Log # 013070), dated 8/26/16, demanding to be seen by a nurse as I believed the water was contaminated, and as a result of me drinking it, I had suffered a personal injury.

Continue reading “My Continued Efforts To Expose and Resist The Contaminated Water Problem in Virginia Prisons. Part 2.”

My Continued Efforts To Expose and Resist The Contaminated Water Problem in Virginia Prisons. Part 1.

My Continued Efforts To Expose And Resist The Contaminated Water Problem In Virginia Prisons
By Uhuru B. Rowe
December 4, 2017
E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

“WE WANT the Abolition of any VADOc policy, practice, or procedure which violates the human/constitutional rights of incarcerated people and endangers/hinders their…physical health…including but not limited to…VADOc inhumane practice of not providing incarcerated people with access to clean drinking water. The water in Virginia prisons is discolored, foul-tasting, and foul-smelling as a result of being contaminated with high levels of rust, lead, and other contaminants. Whether free or incarcerated, having access to safe and clean drinking water is a fundamental Human Right!” — Demand #16(J) of the Free Virginia Movement

Continue reading “My Continued Efforts To Expose and Resist The Contaminated Water Problem in Virginia Prisons. Part 1.”

On The Need For United Front Between Prisoners and Working Class People

By Uhuru B. Rowe
October 3, 2017
E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

“We believe that as presently practiced, mass incarceration under the guise of a war on crime or a war on drugs is actually a war on the working class. Through such a guise, an important fact is often forgotten and hidden in plain sight; the overwhelming majority of individuals who are sent to prison are members of the working class.”– Industrial Workers Organizing Committee

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The Political Action Committee of the Free Virginia Movement

By Uhuru Rowe, Founder
May 27, 2017

E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

Blog: https:consciousprisoner.wordpress.com

Facebook: https:www.facebook.com/supportuhuru

“Capitalism causes crime. Overwhelmingly, the victims of crime are poor and Third World people. Street crime is caused and perpetuated by joblessness and underemployment; by a ruling class that uses people for its own profit and discards them when it has no more profitable use for them. The capitalist prison and its bureaucracy is a loathsome parasite on society. Its sole purpose is to administer the warehousing and repression of human beings for whom capitalism has no use and no solution.”–George Jackson Brigade, in Capitalism Is Organized Crime

The Free Virginia Movement (FVM) is proposing the formation of a Political Action Committee (PAC) which is a major point in Our Organizing Strategy.

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The Free Virginia Movement

The Free Virginia Movement
By Uhuru B. Rowe, Founder

REVISED May 12, 2017

E-mail: uhururowe76@yahoo.com

WHO WE ARE

The Free Virginia Movement is an Inside-Out/Outside-In all-inclusive, coalition-based statewide movment and organizing effort founded by incarcerated people in the Virginia Department of Corrections in solidarity with the class struggles of Black, Brown, poor, low-income, disenfranchised, and working class people, to redress inhumane and harsh prison conditions; racial, class, and gender bias in the criminal legal system; the effects of mass incarceration and felony disenfranchisement laws on Black, Brown, poor, low-income and working-class communities; and the miriad of other laws, policies, and practices and procedures which discriminates against people because of their race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, age, or disability. We recognize that incarcerated, Black, Brown, poor, low-income, oppressed, disenfranchised, and working-class people, are all victims of capitalist oppression and exploitation, Inside and Outside of prisons.

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