Uhuru Baraka Rowe’s statement of solidarity with people in prison who are on hunger strike in Alabama, California, and Palestine…

July 7, 2014

Revolutionary Greetings:

Feeling that my essay “From Unity to Collective Liberation” did not sufficiently (or specifically) express my solidarity with the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) and the California and Palestinian hunger strikers, this letter is to serve as my expression of solidarity with the above brave souls. Continue reading “Uhuru Baraka Rowe’s statement of solidarity with people in prison who are on hunger strike in Alabama, California, and Palestine…”

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I know why the Caged Bird Sings

Written in memory of the late, great, poet and activist, Maya Angelou

I know why the caged bird sings.

It sings because it is trapped in a life of hell, inside a tiny cage, unable to move but a few spaces in one direction or the other.

It sings because it is alone, trapped with indifference… held captive in a unnatural habitat against its will.

It sings out of pure desperation, hoping that someone or something will hear its cries for help and will come and liberate it from its unjust, inhuman enslavement.

It sings while patiently waiting for its captors to slipup, make a mistake and leave the cage door ajar…

Then it will flee, fly speedily away, only briefly looking back to behold the misery and torture of isolation and captivity it was fortunate to leave behind.

It will fly to where its ancestors dwelled in peace and security, and dance in the fields where its distant cousins socialized freely while collectively foraging for food.

It will warn them of the genocide, terror and horror that awaits them if they suffer the unfortunate fate of being captured for4 entertainment, consumption or capitalist profit.

So, do not be mistake…

The caged bird is singing songs, not of joy and contentment, but of RAGE and REVOLUTION!

From Unity to Collective Liberation: Learning to Unite Against Gender Oppression

Just recently I finished studying a book from PM Press by Chris Crass titled Towards Collective Liberation. This was one of the best political/activist books I’ve read, and it has been vital in helping me clarify my political vision and goal for creating liberating and transformative change within myself and the world. Continue reading “From Unity to Collective Liberation: Learning to Unite Against Gender Oppression”

Hands up! Don’t shoot: The genocidal killing of Michael Brown

Yes, it has happened again. Another unarmed Black male murdered by the police. The location: this time in the racially divided town of Ferguson, Missouri.

On Aug. 9, 2014, 18-year-old Michael Brown and a friend were walking down a street in their own community when they were confronted by an officer for allegedly interfering with traffic. Translation: They were confronted by the officer for the crime of “walking while Black.” The end result of this racial profiling was Brown succumbing to a hail of bullets and his friend literally running for his life. Continue reading “Hands up! Don’t shoot: The genocidal killing of Michael Brown”

My Struggle for Freedom in the midst of Virginia’s Truth-in-Sentencing and Abolition of Parole Laws

I am a 38-year-old Black male from the city of Richmond, Virginia, who has been incarcerated at various prisons in the Virginia Department of Corrections for over 20 consecutive years. I am serving a 93-year prison sentence without the possibility of parole for my participation in a robbery that resulted in the shooting deaths of two innocent people.

Uhuru (right) visits with his family, stepfather James, mother Claretha and nephew Remarkable, on Oct. 7, 2012.

Faced with overwhelming evidence of my guilt, I entered into a “blind” plea to two counts of second degree murder, robbery, and three counts of use of a firearm during the commission of a felony, although I never possessed a gun. Little did I know, my fate was sealed. Continue reading “My Struggle for Freedom in the midst of Virginia’s Truth-in-Sentencing and Abolition of Parole Laws”